All electric motorhomes.... Possible or not?

Derekoak

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I think the idea is the first lane of most motorways would be electrified with overhead cables. Beyond that local delivery hub lorries would be different technology.
Some folk these days object to windfarms all over the place, so the plan seems to put them out of sight, way off the coast. Motorways are massive disruptions already, a few wires will make little difference there. Perhaps there will need to be special facilities by bridges to stop idiots poking the wires with long rods.
 
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Martin P

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What we really need is a way of storing energy, maybe as a liquid for example, a way of storing it , maybe a tank then places on the highway where it would be a matter of minutes to fill your tank with said liquid.
Worlds been over run with born again "we're all doomed ders"
Looks like we are going to be stuck with technology which is more expensive and less convenient.
Im sticking with the beautiful, exciting, poetry of the internal combustion engine. One of mans all time best inventions
 

Asterix

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What we really need is a way of storing energy, maybe as a liquid for example, a way of storing it , maybe a tank then places on the highway where it would be a matter of minutes to fill your tank with said liquid.
Worlds been over run with born again "we're all doomed ders"
Looks like we are going to be stuck with technology which is more expensive and less convenient.
Im sticking with the beautiful, exciting, poetry of the internal combustion engine. One of mans all time best inventions
Resistance to change is nothing new,eg when we went from horses to steam,the horse owners/breeders said it'll never happen but it did. Then we moved from steam to electric cars but the technology wasn't up to scratch so we went with the internal combustion engine as a poor alternative. We are finally after over a hundred years now ready to take the big leap back to electric,but now have the advancements to make it work. By the time its fully rolled out we'll both be dead and buried and the nay sayers will just be another footnote in the history books,along with the IC engines.
 

mark61

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Resistance to change is nothing new,eg when we went from horses to steam,the horse owners/breeders said it'll never happen but it did. Then we moved from steam to electric cars but the technology wasn't up to scratch so we went with the internal combustion engine as a poor alternative. We are finally after over a hundred years now ready to take the big leap back to electric,but now have the advancements to make it work. By the time its fully rolled out we'll both be dead and buried and the nay sayers will just be another footnote in the history books,along with the IC engines.
There was probably space for both electric and IC motors to exist. It was not by accident electric motors were pushed virtually out of the place, we are now playing catch up.
 

Asterix

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There was probably space for both electric and IC motors to exist. It was not by accident electric motors were pushed virtually out of the place, we are now playing catch up.
I think it would have been recognised early on that electric was superior in every way,had we had the tech we have now I doubt noisy,smelly,high maintenance ices would've got anywhere. Water under the bridge now...let's just get it done! (Where have I heard that before)
 

trevskoda

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By the time electric lands on us full time i if alive will be past driving and it will be on my son or daughters head to take me out or visit me in the old farts home. 😂 😂 😂
 

Asterix

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By the time electric lands on us full time i if alive will be past driving and it will be on my son or daughters head to take me out or visit me in the old farts home. 😂 😂 😂
By the time you're too old to drive we'll have autonomous cars to take you wherever you want,just give it directions by dribbling on the dashboard.😁
 

mark61

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I think it would have been recognised early on that electric was superior in every way,had we had the tech we have now I doubt noisy,smelly,high maintenance ices would've got anywhere. Water under the bridge now...let's just get it done! (Where have I heard that before)
I think even back at the beginning of motors, it was recognised there was many situations where electric was superior.
The "not by accident" was in relation to the lobbying of the petrochemical industry.
 

Ellendale

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Forgive my ignorance but don't most homes use natural gas as in British Gas? I believe it is a different type of gas to the LPG used in my car. I have attached an extract from an emissions test. When I asked the tester what the readings actually meant in layman's terms he said "so little it's practically zero, apart from the h2O coming out of your exhaust!"
Even the companies promoting LPG conversions don't claim zero emissions, and for good reason, whilst they are very low emissions they can't achieve zero, so you have a totally unique car.
BTW , the MOT doesn't check co2 or particulates, and it's Hydrogen that only produces water on combustion.
Forgive my ignorance but don't most homes use natural gas as in British Gas? I believe it is a different type of gas to the LPG used in my car. I have attached an extract from an emissions test. When I asked the tester what the readings actually meant in layman's terms he said "so little it's practically zero, apart from the h2O coming out of your exhaust!" So my reply was based on this info. Apologies if it's wrong.
 

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colinm

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Forgive my ignorance but don't most homes use natural gas as in British Gas? I believe it is a different type of gas to the LPG used in my car. I have attached an extract from an emissions test. When I asked the tester what the readings actually meant in layman's terms he said "so little it's practically zero, apart from the h2O coming out of your exhaust!"

Forgive my ignorance but don't most homes use natural gas as in British Gas? I believe it is a different type of gas to the LPG used in my car. I have attached an extract from an emissions test. When I asked the tester what the readings actually meant in layman's terms he said "so little it's practically zero, apart from the h2O coming out of your exhaust!" So my reply was based on this info. Apologies if it's wrong.
The MOT test covers CO (carbon monoxide) and HC (hydrocarbons), it doesn't cover co2.
Just got out the cert for our 54 reg Suzi 4x4, whilst the CO on your van is roughly 1/10th, your HC is over 20 times higher. I don't know why your MOT tester thinks only water is coming out the exhaust.
 

trevskoda

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The MOT test covers CO (carbon monoxide) and HC (hydrocarbons), it doesn't cover co2.
Just got out the cert for our 54 reg Suzi 4x4, whilst the CO on your van is roughly 1/10th, your HC is over 20 times higher. I don't know why your MOT tester thinks only water is coming out the exhaust.
Bet he would not drink it. 😂
 

UFO

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Hyundai have a hydrogen fuel-cell electric truck. The 190kw fuel cell can haul a 36 tonne truck-trailer combination up to 400km and refuel in 8 minutes. In the pipeline is a fuel cell with more hauling power and a range of 1,000km.

The Hyundai ix35 Fuel Cell, compact SUV, can travel 594 kilometres on a full tank and refuelling takes just 3-5 minutes. The price is £53,105 which includes part funding from the HyFive Project.

If a motorhome is between a truck and a car then based on the above the prospects look good. Still some way to go with price and refuelling infrasturcture but things are moving in the right direction.
 

Wully

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Here’s a decent video on electric motorhomes. Think the narrator needs too loosen his belt a notch he seems to get a bit exited.


 
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