All electric motorhomes.... Possible or not?

Fazerloz

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Plenty of rain forrest left to turn into coffee plantations.
You might need to bring your own cup though. :)
But what about when the rest of the world goes electric there wont be enough forest then. :unsure: I suppose they will have to drink tea. (y)
 

GeoffL

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Charge your van at a garage or charge point, campsite power will not require to change.
However, the infrastructure will. For that, I suspect that the infrastructure is inadequate to cope with total conversion to EVs even without converting mohos to EVs and the speed at which authorities move, I suspect 'they' won't be able to beef up the infrastructure to cope with increased demand as older ICEVs are retired.

Unless the law and/or battery technology changes, the weight of batteries will reduce available payload by at least 450kg with ~1,000kg reduction being necessary for full-sized vans with a decent range. AFAICT, PHGVs aren't affected but the government is considering expanding the ban to include HGVs and currently in discussion with the haulage industry about this.
 

GeoffL

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I could be about to eat my own words as I've just discovered something that might be an answer, not just for motorhomes but for all EVs. The linked YouTube video describes Aluminium/Air fuel cells. These have close to the same effective energy density as petroleum fuels and, since electric motors tend to be lighter than diesel engines, might even result in increased payload. The anode will need to be changed every 1000km or so and you'll need to top up the electrolyte every couple of hundred miles, but this should be on par timewise with stops for petrol or diesel and no requirement for widespread infrastructure upgrades. The channel posting the video tends to deal with upcoming technology rather than stuff that's market-ready, but it's nonetheless interesting IMO.
 

trevskoda

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I did say that included tax, insurance and fuel Trev.

If you burn that or even double that in a week, then you are clearly doing more than 12k miles a year. Your argument was that if you do less than 12k a year taxi's would be cheaper.

I'll give you an example. On a Friday (when not locked down) Julie gives me a lift to the pub - this costs less than a pound. At the end of the night I get a taxi home, this costs about £12. If we didn't have a car that would be £12 each way. I usually do the same on Saturday and Sunday, so just those 3 days could potentially cost £72 if we didn't have a car - or potentially £6 if we did!

That is without considering all of the trips to the shops, visiting friend and family, the odd school run for the grandkids etc. etc. Not considering the inconvenience of forever ringing taxis and they not being available.

Sorry, but your argument just does not stack up.
I read it all on the money program, i have not looked into it in detail, you say £12 for a taxi, well £6 here from my house to Belfast which is just over 6 miles, think there robbing you when piss-d on they way home. 😂
 

Robmac

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I read it all on the money program, i have not looked into it in detail, you say £12 for a taxi, well £6 here from my house to Belfast which is just over 6 miles, think there robbing you when piss-d on they way home. 😂
Too many factors for such a blanket statement Trev.

If I bought a Lamborghini for £200,000 then did 10 miles a week, then yes it would be cheaper to get taxi's after depreciation is considered. I paid my daughter 2 grand for my wifes car 7 years ago, and that was doing my daughter a favour.

That works out a further £23 per month but at least I still have something to show for it which is perfectly useable.

As for getting ripped off, I reckon you are ripping off your taxi drivers! NI taxi rates are £3.80 for the first mile plus £1.60 for each additional mile so a 6 mile journey should be £11.80 and that's daytime rates.
 

mark61

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Too many factors for such a blanket statement Trev.

If I bought a Lamborghini for £200,000 then did 10 miles a week, then yes it would be cheaper to get taxi's after depreciation is considered. I paid my daughter 2 grand for my wifes car 7 years ago, and that was doing my daughter a favour.

That works out a further £23 per month but at least I still have something to show for it which is perfectly useable.

As for getting ripped off, I reckon you are ripping off your taxi drivers! NI taxi rates are £3.80 for the first mile plus £1.60 for each additional mile so a 6 mile journey should be £11.80 and that's daytime rates.
Trev forgot to mention it was 1984 when he last got a taxi for £6, that included tip. 😛 :)
 

trevskoda

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Too many factors for such a blanket statement Trev.

If I bought a Lamborghini for £200,000 then did 10 miles a week, then yes it would be cheaper to get taxi's after depreciation is considered. I paid my daughter 2 grand for my wifes car 7 years ago, and that was doing my daughter a favour.

That works out a further £23 per month but at least I still have something to show for it which is perfectly useable.

As for getting ripped off, I reckon you are ripping off your taxi drivers! NI taxi rates are £3.80 for the first mile plus £1.60 for each additional mile so a 6 mile journey should be £11.80 and that's daytime rates.
Seems they dont take tokens or 10 bob notes on buses anymore either. 😂
 
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