All electric motorhomes.... Possible or not?

Derekoak

Full Member
Posts
474
Likes
321
Ah, it has a 5 megawatt connection to the grid..... so when its not sufficiently sunny and there's a high pressure sitting over the UK meaning wind is producing virtually nothing, the EVs will be charged up by gas fired power stations. He seemed quite dismissive of "fossil burners".....
We have supply links to other wind/sun systems. We can bring in power from them on the odd occasions where we have no sun and no wind. Of course we should have more supply links in the future. As I say there are potential storage options too. Enabling demand flexibility tariffs are another partial solution. Hydrogen power station conversions are another possibility. Gas should become less and less relevant. We do not need to stay with the status quo.
 

bjh

Full Member
Posts
4
Likes
4
Brilliant video. I think that must answer most peoples worries and insecurities about electric vehicles. This guy has sorted the problems that many none believers keep raising. Personally I can manage quite happily on a 13A plug at home, but should I need a top up some where the day is coming when it will be easy. Electric motor homes will come, but it will take a while before engineers develop practical solutions. There will be an answer.
 

Norfolk Jim

Full Member
Posts
83
Likes
103
AFAIK no fuel stations are getting grants, if they want to stay in business they need to do it themselves. Shell already own over 135,000 public charge points across europe, but I think the traditional fuel station will be a thing of the past. I can see there being Costa and Starbucks type charging centres, you go to the coffee shop and charge your car.
You're right Trev. On the news yesterday we have the first in the UK only electric service/fuel station near Braintree and guess what it has a Costa...........

My wife pointed out - I don't want to spend half an hour at a service station waiting for car to be charged! Normally when we go on a long journey we stop to fill up with fuel; perhaps use toilets and then go. Don't want to be hanging around those places. I suppose as technology get's on top of charging the time it takes will come down - a bit like mobile phones which used to take all day to charge and now take perhaps half an hour or so. It was interesting to see at the back of this site away from main forecourt there were 6 Tesla charging points - I don't know much about them but have noticed Tesla's don't seem to be on them very long?
 

oppy

Full Member
Posts
3,205
Likes
4,629
As a youngster we had trolley busses, or silent death as my dad called them, and during a short spell of unemployment I got a temporary job as a milkman that came with an electric vehicle, so have we progressed ?????????????? A friend of ours ( a rather posh one !!) has an electric Jag and he can't even visit relatives in Cornwall without an overnight stop en route, our 11 year old Kia diesel Ce ed will do it on less than a tank full. We have friends and family down there and generally only fill up for our return journey. Not having read the 14 previous pages this is probably a repeat of much that has already been said, but I just wonder how environmentally friendly the manufacturing process is in this ' save the planet' crusade
 

Tookey

Full Member
Posts
1,067
Likes
1,439
As a youngster we had trolley busses, or silent death as my dad called them, and during a short spell of unemployment I got a temporary job as a milkman that came with an electric vehicle, so have we progressed ?????????????? A friend of ours ( a rather posh one !!) has an electric Jag and he can't even visit relatives in Cornwall without an overnight stop en route, our 11 year old Kia diesel Ce ed will do it on less than a tank full. We have friends and family down there and generally only fill up for our return journey. Not having read the 14 previous pages this is probably a repeat of much that has already been said, but I just wonder how environmentally friendly the manufacturing process is in this ' save the planet' crusade
The consequences of mining and manufacturing and overall 'green's impact' is still debatable but what isn't is that millions of people (plus flora and fauna) are breathing CE exhaust fumes everyday and we are going to reduce and then eradicate that. It is arguable that that alone should be enough of an incentive.
 

colinm

Full Member
Posts
2,761
Likes
2,212
A friend of ours ( a rather posh one !!) has an electric Jag and he can't even visit relatives in Cornwall without an overnight stop en route, our 11 year old Kia diesel Ce ed will do it on less than a tank full. We have friends and family down there and generally only fill up for our return journey.
A friend of mine has property in Cornwall and regularly drives down there in his Tesla. Considering the choice of vehicles he has to do the journey that tells me all I need to know.
BTW, he has been known to do the return journey in one day, if business needs.
p.s. that's around 300 miles each way.
 

Robmac

Full Member
Posts
23,850
Likes
29,947
A friend of mine has property in Cornwall and regularly drives down there in his Tesla. Considering the choice of vehicles he has to do the journey that tells me all I need to know.
BTW, he has been known to do the return journey in one day, if business needs.
p.s. that's around 300 miles each way.
Problem is Colin that a Tesla is out of reach for many people and is quite a bit lighter than a motorhome which is what the thread is about.

Apologies if that is out of context as I haven't read a lot of posts in this thread.
 

colinm

Full Member
Posts
2,761
Likes
2,212
Problem is Colin that a Tesla is out of reach for many people and is quite a bit lighter than a motorhome which is what the thread is about.

Apologies if that is out of context as I haven't read a lot of posts in this thread.
My post was in direct reply to one about driving cars to Cornwall. As I post just above, I don't believe BEV's are practical for Motorhomes, at least not at present, and I don't see any battery improvements in the pipeline that will change that.
 

Derekoak

Full Member
Posts
474
Likes
321
This article is about the governments own expert's predictions. Saying if we invest now we will pretty much be paid back by savings by 2050.
The point is it assumes a massive role for hydrogen. Once you have 10,000 massive offshore wind turbines there is enough energy to not care about differences in efficiency and storage is largely hydrogen stores from windy periods


 

mark61

Full Member
Posts
4,941
Likes
4,253
The additional weight is only a paperwork/legal problem.
What is now based on a 3.5 tonne van will have to be based on the 5+ tonne version. Extra 1500 KG of battery should be ok for 500 miles :)
Day drive to Morocco still out the window though.
 

trevskoda

Full Member
Posts
22,898
Likes
23,981
Heres the answer you've all been looking for,couple of bolts through the roof and you're ready to go!

Had that in the fifties, called trolleybuses, big problem was they could not divert round a road problem and required a truck to pull them to other lines, also all this electric has to come from some other place, the energy used to build turbines is greater than the return, so not green at all.
 

maingate

Full Member
Posts
11,213
Likes
10,636
Heres the answer you've all been looking for,couple of bolts through the roof and you're ready to go!

Siemens are about to get into Hydrogen in a big way. I got this from my Grandson who works for them and hopes to be part of it.
 

Derekoak

Full Member
Posts
474
Likes
321
Heres the answer you've all been looking for,couple of bolts through the roof and you're ready to go!

I mentioned that earlier. @Asterix Thanks for finding a link. @trevskoda the difference with the 50's is that the trucks have a battery to get off route to their final destination, from memory 30 mile battery range. They would have no problem with a normal road problem. They would divert and recharge when back on the overhead lines.
 

trevskoda

Full Member
Posts
22,898
Likes
23,981
I mentioned that earlier. @Asterix Thanks for finding a link. @trevskoda the difference with the 50's is that the trucks have a battery to get off route to their final destination, from memory 30 mile battery range. They would have no problem with a normal road problem. They would divert and recharge when back on the overhead lines.
Not much good in country side, folk these days would object to cables all over the place
 
Top