Vaccine Passports

antiquesam

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Latest from ambulance crews in our area, very few elderly in the last week, increasing numbers of 20 and 30 year olds, who where otherwise fit, not all will be making it out alive.
I'm not doubting the young are getting ill. I'm saying they are complaining that they've been shut down to protect the old, who shouldn't be selfish enough to want to get out of the box they've been stuck in for twelve months and go on holiday, perhaps forgetting that 45 percent of those who have passed away were elderly in care homes and there are more young vulnerable than there are over 65's in total.
This is more of a warning to fellow motorhomers not to be too noisy about their dreams.
 

Tim120

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I have an 'International Certificate of Vaccination or Prophylaxis' with one entry for 'Stamaril Yellow Fever' sounds impressive eh!
Small little booklet filled in and issued by the practice nurse, completed in biro (black cos blue don't count) four pages stapled together and folded in half.
Proof positive should anyone require it and I remember to carry it, I had been vaccinated against 'Yellow Fever'.
Never given a thought that it may become important at a border check somewhere.
I'd like to think that something important as proof of a C19 vaccination would not be open to abuse as a handwritten piece of paper.
 

Tim120

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Initial indications are that being vaccinated does reduce transmission. Link
If only that information had come from someone who was not a politician (hope that doesn't get the thread pulled). I suppose if there are fewer residents in care homes and those remaining have been vaccinated then it's obvious transmission rates will be lower, mortalities and vaccinations equals reduced transmission.
 

REC

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I do think that hospital staff/ care workers will have the jab added as another mandatory vaccination eventually. For heath and safety of workers and patients, we have to be vaccinated with MMR, TB, HepB and Varicella immunity proven or cannot work.
 

Minisorella

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Some kind of vaccine passport for overseas travel, yes. It makes perfect sense because it gives them confidence that you stand very little chance of being a drain on their local medical resources and are highly unlikely to be spreading something new.

Needing vaccine passports within the UK? Definitely no! - it's almost verging on hysteria now and is pointless and illogical if you think about it. Lots of businesses and venues are now saying they don't want to employ/admit anyone without a passport because "we want to protect our staff and customers". The hugely overwhelming point of having the vaccine is to protect yourself against serious disease or death if you do get infected. Yes, there's a secondary effect of the vax in giving protection to others because of reduced transmission etc but that will be afforded to everyone else equally - those with or without a vaccine - and it's coming from you, not them. Bear with me! If you sit next to an unvaccinated person in the cinema, who is most at risk? They are of course because you've got your safety shield, they haven't. The protection those company bosses spoke of already sits with all those staff and customers who are vaccinated and is helping to protect all the people they mingle with. Yes anyone could still be unlucky enough to catch Covid but the unvaccinated are the ones taking the bigger risk. Substitute the world flu for Covid and you'll appreciate the nonsense that this is. Ultimately, we should hopefully be able to live with Covid as we live with flu - it's out there and it could be deadly but we've had our jabs.

Another point is that our percentages of people taking up the vaccine will likely ensure that case numbers eventually remain very low in the UK. The fewer cases there are in the community, the less chance it has to mutate into something nasty. The small proportion of unvaccinated people are more likely to be infecting each other than those who rolled their sleeves up but there won't be enough of them to effect the whole picture.
 

Minisorella

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I do think that hospital staff/ care workers will have the jab added as another mandatory vaccination eventually. For heath and safety of workers and patients, we have to be vaccinated with MMR, TB, HepB and Varicella immunity proven or cannot work.
Ruth I agree, that's a very good point (y) The main difference with Covid is that most of the patients as well as the staff will already have been vaccinated, so it isn't such a one-sided risk situation... which is great :)
 
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Brockley

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My vaccination card records the two dates administered, each of the administering nurses signatures and the batch numbers of each jab (Pfizer). Looks very unimpressive and could surely never be considered a passport in its own right.

The only thing I can imagine is that because GP’s are notified of both injections, some sort of bona fide certificate could be issued by them accordingly and would stand up to any scrutiny?

Have to say I thought that those bothering to take a vaccine for the right reasons would at least be given an edge (in priority of freedom to travel) over conspiracy theorists and doubter who simply disguise fear with bravado.
 

Snapster

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Some kind of vaccine passport for overseas travel, yes. It makes perfect sense because it gives them confidence that you stand very little chance of being a drain on their local medical resources and are highly unlikely to be spreading something new.

Needing vaccine passports within the UK? Definitely no! - it's almost verging on hysteria now and is pointless and illogical if you think about it. Lots of businesses and venues are now saying they don't want to employ/admit anyone without a passport because "we want to protect our staff and customers". The hugely overwhelming point of having the vaccine is to protect yourself against serious disease or death if you do get infected. Yes, there's a secondary effect of the vax in giving protection to others because of reduced transmission etc but that will be afforded to everyone else equally - those with or without a vaccine - and it's coming from you, not them. Bear with me! If you sit next to an unvaccinated person in the cinema, who is most at risk? They are of course because you've got your safety shield, they haven't. The protection those company bosses spoke of already sits with all those staff and customers who are vaccinated and is helping to protect all the people they mingle with. Yes anyone could still be unlucky enough to catch Covid but the unvaccinated are the ones taking the bigger risk. Substitute the world flu for Covid and you'll appreciate the nonsense that this is. Ultimately, we should hopefully be able to live with Covid as we live with flu - it's out there and it could be deadly but we've had our jabs.

Another point is that our percentages of people taking up the vaccine will likely ensure that case numbers eventually remain very low in the UK. The fewer cases there are in the community, the less chance it has to mutate into something nasty. The small proportion of unvaccinated people are more likely to be infecting each other than those who rolled their sleeves up but there won't be enough of them to effect the whole picture.
I’m wondering about virus mutations and if people who have not had the vaccine are more likely to harbour and pass on these mutations?
If that is the case then could they be at risk of passing on a mutation that the vaccine has no defence against?

I know viruses mutate all the time but it seems logical that these mutations have more chance of being spread by the unvaccinated.
I don’t know the answer, just thinking aloud!
 

Tookey

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I’m wondering about virus mutations and if people who have not had the vaccine are more likely to harbour and pass on these mutations?
If that is the case then could they be at risk of passing on a mutation that the vaccine has no defence against?

I know viruses mutate all the time but it seems logical that these mutations have more chance of being spread by the unvaccinated.
I don’t know the answer, just thinking aloud!
Just like the flu I think we will continuously be adapting, flu and covid jabs for high risk groups
 

tidewatcher

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I think that apart from the obvious advantages of rolling out the vaccine to every adult perhaps an equally important factor is that once all are vaccinated anyone who gets Covid symptoms is likely to have a new variant. Testing for new variants would be much easier when there are few cases reported and local measures to try and contain them easier. This would buy time for tweaking a booster shot vaccine. That’s my three in the morning thought for the day.......
 

Peisinoe

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It looks likely that vaccine passports may help to open up international travel later this year. Link
Nothing new really, many countries have required certain vaccinations for entry before.
You mean the passport the government have said numerous times its not doing one? The same government that gave thousands to two companies to develop one months before they said they were not doing one.
 

Minisorella

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I’m wondering about virus mutations and if people who have not had the vaccine are more likely to harbour and pass on these mutations?
If that is the case then could they be at risk of passing on a mutation that the vaccine has no defence against?

I know viruses mutate all the time but it seems logical that these mutations have more chance of being spread by the unvaccinated.
I don’t know the answer, just thinking aloud!
Good points. I don't know the answer either but there are lots of clues.

As of early February, over 4,000 variants had been identified since the start of the pandemic but most are not of concern, so we only hear about the handful that gain some kind of strong advantage for survival, like being more contagious or avoiding the vaccine antibodies.

We all know that the more cases there are in the community, the more chance there is of the virus throwing up a nasty variant. Lockdown is bringing cases down rapidly and in another couple of months, case numbers should be very low and easily monitored, fingers crossed. If the vaccine take-up stays as incredibly high as it is now, there won't be enough active infections to give the virus a good chance to whip up a killer variation.

It's now easier to monitor border arrivals and to test, track and trace all cases to clamp down on any variants... will be even easier once case numbers are low.

We have some of the best genome sequencing labs and expertise in the world here (we do the sequencing for roughly 50% of the world!) so if something scary crops up, we'll know about it and the vaccine will be tweaked.

Bottom line is, I guess I've made up my mind, from what we know, to see the future as bright... the justified doom and gloom of the past year has been absolutely exhausting and damaging. I plan to make the most of my 'get out of jail' vaccine and not worry about catching Covid now that it's unlikely to kill me... until I'm told there's something new to worry about of course! :ROFLMAO:
 

mariesnowgoose

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Good points. I don't know the answer either but there are lots of clues.

As of early February, over 4,000 variants had been identified since the start of the pandemic but most are not of concern, so we only hear about the handful that gain some kind of strong advantage for survival, like being more contagious or avoiding the vaccine antibodies.

We all know that the more cases there are in the community, the more chance there is of the virus throwing up a nasty variant. Lockdown is bringing cases down rapidly and in another couple of months, case numbers should be very low and easily monitored, fingers crossed. If the vaccine take-up stays as incredibly high as it is now, there won't be enough active infections to give the virus a good chance to whip up a killer variation.

It's now easier to monitor border arrivals and to test, track and trace all cases to clamp down on any variants... will be even easier once case numbers are low.

We have some of the best genome sequencing labs and expertise in the world here (we do the sequencing for roughly 50% of the world!) so if something scary crops up, we'll know about it and the vaccine will be tweaked.

Bottom line is, I guess I've made up my mind, from what we know, to see the future as bright... the justified doom and gloom of the past year has been absolutely exhausting and damaging. I plan to make the most of my 'get out of jail' vaccine and not worry about catching Covid now that it's unlikely to kill me... until I'm told there's something new to worry about of course! :ROFLMAO:
Ditto (y)
 

maingate

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You mean the passport the government have said numerous times its not doing one? The same government that gave thousands to two companies to develop one months before they said they were not doing one.
Our Government does not have to do anything about Covid Passports .... but it means you are not going anywhere for a long time if other Governments do.

And it would be prudent to invest in a plan for that eventuality.
 

mark61

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InnovateUK is a government agency, it has already ploughed money with at least two biometrics companies to look into a vaccine passport.

While I still oppose the idea of a vaccine passport, (at least until we are given a lot more information) I agree we need to be ready for other countries requiring them.
 

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