Full Timing in Static Caravan plus Motorhome - Advice Needed Please ?

shaunr68

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What requirements do you need to live or buy property in the South?
Under Common Travel Area arrangements any British citizen has the right to live and work in (the Republic of) Ireland and likewise any Irish citizen has the right to live and work in the UK. I lived there myself for a couple of years and still own half of a property in County Clare.


"The Common Travel Area (CTA) is a long-standing arrangement between the UK, the Crown Dependencies (Bailiwick of Jersey, Bailiwick of Guernsey and the Isle of Man) and Ireland.

Under the CTA, British and Irish citizens can move freely and reside in either jurisdiction. British and Irish citizens enjoy associated reciprocal rights and privileges, including the right to work, study and vote in certain elections, as well as to access social welfare benefits and health services."
 

izwozral

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Static sites is something we looked into but were e warned off them by people who had been there and done that. Pity as they were in superb locations and nice accommodation. They are usually run by unsavoury characters so I'm told.
I bite my lip at this point.

Also looked into buying land to camp on but it's pretty much a no go situation.

For a so called free country we don't half have tight shackles.
 

trevskoda

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If you build on land and its visible for over 4 years you get away without planing,big chance to take mind you with goggle earth they can now see you.
 

jagmanx

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Under Common Travel Area arrangements any British citizen has the right to live and work in (the Republic of) Ireland and likewise any Irish citizen has the right to live and work in the UK. I lived there myself for a couple of years and still own half of a property in County Clare.


"The Common Travel Area (CTA) is a long-standing arrangement between the UK, the Crown Dependencies (Bailiwick of Jersey, Bailiwick of Guernsey and the Isle of Man) and Ireland.

Under the CTA, British and Irish citizens can move freely and reside in either jurisdiction. British and Irish citizens enjoy associated reciprocal rights and privileges, including the right to work, study and vote in certain elections, as well as to access social welfare benefits and health services."
Thanks

There are so many layers of regulations but I have always thought that in effect UK & NI together with ROI are almost as one.
I also suspect this will remain whatever happens with BREXIT after all it pre-dates both joining and leaving Europe.
AND all the political manouevres are similarly focused (not that that matters in this respect)
 

shaunr68

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Thanks

There are so many layers of regulations but I have always thought that in effect UK & NI together with ROI are almost as one.
I also suspect this will remain whatever happens with BREXIT after all it pre-dates both joining and leaving Europe.
AND all the political manouevres are similarly focused (not that that matters in this respect)
You're right, the CTA arrangements pre-date our membership of the EU by decades and it is very unlikely that Brexit will have any impact. There is a strong cultural connection to the UK, just about every farmer over the age of 50 had spent time working on building sites in the UK and most still had family over here, brothers who had married and remained etc, so half their families are English these days. Similarly there are a large number of British people with Irish heritage and I think I read that 15% of the population of County Clare where I lived was from the UK, predominantly English.

Although rural houses can be found quite cheaply you pay in other ways. The healthcare system is a poor relation to the NHS and most people have private health insurance. Dealing with bureaucracy can be a nightmare, the small population has allowed motor insurers to operate a virtual cartel keeping prices inflated and, well, try renovating an old cottage when living 50 miles from the closest decent DIY outlet!

In terms of the OP's plan, Ireland is a great example of why planning restrictions should NOT be relaxed. During the “Celtic Tiger” period, as my neighbour described it "everyone thought they were going to be a millionaire", planning laws were lifted and every Tom, Dick and Harry built himself a huge carbunkle of a McMansion on a couple of acres of green belt where they remain, half-built as an eyesore everywhere you look on the horizon.

 

jagmanx

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Thanks and yes.
Boom and Bust ! Rural areas are under resourced. We toured from Larne via Donegal and the WaW then to Rosslare and Ferry to Wales. Lovely and great land and property BUT.... Without aiming to politicise I suggest ROI is desperate for no trade barriers (as indeed is Ulster). I choose not to comment on the wider political issues. Just add that inevitably the west coast is very wet ! (or soft) . We were near Cork and it was sunny and warm. A local said "enjoy today it is summer but lookout tomorrow!"
 

landoboguy

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If you build on land and its visible for over 4 years you get away without planing,big chance to take mind you with goggle earth they can now see you.
excatly, the days are gone now where they walk round and check properties. We added a 4m out lean to on the back of our house, full width of course it didnt need planning permission being a temp structure but still shows on the gov website for title deed boundaries, the same for next doors covered area where he has his barbeque and his is tiny compared to mine, but still marked as a structure.
 

Debroos

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Static sites is something we looked into but were e warned off them by people who had been there and done that. Pity as they were in superb locations and nice accommodation. They are usually run by unsavoury characters so I'm told.
I bite my lip at this point.

Also looked into buying land to camp on but it's pretty much a no go situation.

For a so called free country we don't half have tight shackles.
What's the problem with camping as long as you don't do it all the time. I'm sure I remember the Grand Design chappie building a temporary structure with no plumbing or toilet but you could stay there temporarily...
 

izwozral

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What's the problem with camping as long as you don't do it all the time. I'm sure I remember the Grand Design chappie building a temporary structure with no plumbing or toilet but you could stay there temporarily...
What's the problem with camping as long as you don't do it all the time. I'm sure I remember the Grand Design chappie building a temporary structure with no plumbing or toilet but you could stay there temporarily...
There is a 28 day limit to camping on your own land, anything longer you need permission from the council which is never given.
I found some superb plots of land for just a few thousand pounds which would make for permanent or semi permanent livi
ng spaces but it was not to be.
I'm just dreamer in a totalitarian state I guess.
 

Debroos

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There is a 28 day limit to camping on your own land, anything longer you need permission from the council which is never given.
I found some superb plots of land for just a few thousand pounds which would make for permanent or semi permanent livi
ng spaces but it was not to be.
I'm just dreamer in a totalitarian state I guess.
Could you not camp for 28 days and leave for a couple of days, then come back?
 

MichelleB

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Could have posted this in general chat but thought the thread may get some more attention here.
I am likely going to have to move out of where I live next Summer / Autumn 2021

I am thinking of possibly buying land, or possibly staying in a mobile home or static caravan on a park
My area of interest is North Wales as a base

Does anyone know of any space for Van parking or where I could maybe purchase a static with space to park also my van.
I am looking for somewhere close to the Coast?

Any help or advice appreciated, TIA (y)
If you buy a Shepherd’s Hut (on wheels) instead of a static caravan you can get around the planning requirement.
 

trevskoda

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If you buy a Shepherd’s Hut (on wheels) instead of a static caravan you can get around the planning requirement.
Yes but you must have aa good bit of land and more than 3 animals which must show money on books,ie selling wool etc for dosh,by doing this you can also get round paying rates on a house.
 

Markd

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Don't think I'd want to full time in a Shepherd's hut - mind you even static have wheels - would that mean I could say it was a hut😀
 

Debroos

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No, its 28 days in any one calendar year ..
What a pain...so how come people do holiday lets in shepherds huts, yurts etc presumably legally as I know some who are doing it and pay business tax.

Maybe you could have a unit and let it to yourself for holidays! 😄
 

HazelB

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Could have posted this in general chat but thought the thread may get some more attention here.
I am likely going to have to move out of where I live next Summer / Autumn 2021

I am thinking of possibly buying land, or possibly staying in a mobile home or static caravan on a park
My area of interest is North Wales as a base

Does anyone know of any space for Van parking or where I could maybe purchase a static with space to park also my van.
I am looking for somewhere close to the Coast?

Any help or advice appreciated, TIA (y)
We live in our motorhome full-time and are on a seasonal pitch on a site in North Wales because of Covid. You pay for the year but then the pitch is yours for that length of time. We are the only motorhome here. Its very quiet but you can only stay for 28 nights at a time. Not a problem for us as we toddle off for a night or 2 one a month. It's called Lleweni Parc. There might be a spare space at the moment but I am not sure
 
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Val54

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What a pain...so how come people do holiday lets in shepherds huts, yurts etc presumably legally as I know some who are doing it and pay business tax.

Maybe you could have a unit and let it to yourself for holidays! 😄
Most Councils are happy to grant planning permission for holiday accommodation, huts yurts etc to encourage the tourist pound. Getting planning permission for change of use to site a caravan etc for residential accommodation is virtually impossible as legally it is viewed as the same as building a house. So any land that is suitable would attract residential value ☹☹
 

Ferris day off

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If you build on land and its visible for over 4 years you get away without planing,big chance to take mind you with goggle earth they can now see you.
My partner before meeting me got herself into big financial problems. Her solution was to build a shed (same footprint as a static) on her mother's land and live in it. It got electric, water. Waste water to septic tank. It's been up 4 years plus. It's visible from the road. From what you say it looks like the council have missed the chance to impose any type of enforcement. Happy days if correct.
 

colinmd

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My partner before meeting me got herself into big financial problems. Her solution was to build a shed (same footprint as a static) on her mother's land and live in it. It got electric, water. Waste water to septic tank. It's been up 4 years plus. It's visible from the road. From what you say it looks like the council have missed the chance to impose any type of enforcement. Happy days if correct.
If it's classed as a 'concealed development' i.e. built to look like a shed, then no the four year rule doesn't apply AFAIK
 
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