Canoe/marine battery and charging it inside a motorhome

sueant08

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Good morning All.
Being a keen sit on top kayak paddler, I've finally persuaded my other half to join me, but TBH he's more interested in photographing wildlife than paddling so we're looking at an inflatable Canoe (poss Gumotex Ruby XL) and want to put a small electric motor on the back (poss Minn Kota Endura C2 30).
My questions are regarding the marine battery that will power the motor and a portable battery charger.
Does anyone have any advice on type of battery and also on using a battery charger inside the motorhome?
Is it safe?
Would the van electrics take the extra power consumption?
I expect the marine battery would need to be charged when we're on a campsite rather than wild camping.
Any advice or help would be greatly appreciated as I'm googling round in circles right now 🤣
Thank you.
Sue x
 

groyne

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Just an idea, have a look at how to charge electric bikes in the van. Or you could use an inverter and battery charger.
 

colinmd

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The motor you are looking at appears to be 12v, this might be possible to charge the battery for it straight from the campervans present electrics, but as you haven't given any indication as to what your set up is nobody can give a definite answer.
 

davidm

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Good morning All.
Being a keen sit on top kayak paddler, I've finally persuaded my other half to join me, but TBH he's more interested in photographing wildlife than paddling so we're looking at an inflatable Canoe (poss Gumotex Ruby XL) and want to put a small electric motor on the back (poss Minn Kota Endura C2 30).
My questions are regarding the marine battery that will power the motor and a portable battery charger.
Does anyone have any advice on type of battery and also on using a battery charger inside the motorhome?
Is it safe?
Would the van electrics take the extra power consumption?
I expect the marine battery would need to be charged when we're on a campsite rather than wild camping.
Any advice or help would be greatly appreciated as I'm googling round in circles right now 🤣
Thank you.
Sue x
 

sueant08

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The motor you are looking at appears to be 12v, this might be possible to charge the battery for it straight from the campervans present electrics, but as you haven't given any indication as to what your set up is nobody can give a definite answer.
Sorry, I'm not sure what you mean by 'set up'. I have a regular, dealer bought motorhome. It has a leisure battery and hook up. My MH has a microwave, electric/gas fridge, cooker and heater, which I dont use all at the same time.
 

harrow

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if its 12 volts it might be as simple as connecting it to the leisure battery :)
 

sueant08

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if its 12 volts it might be as simple as connecting it to the leisure battery :)
Thak you. The battery that the Canoe motor manufactures recommends is a lead acid 12v deep cycle marine battery with at least 105amp.
My knowledge of electricity and batteries is very limited, but are you saying I may be able to just charge a battery like this through my 12v socket on my motorhome wall panel? And if so, what type of charger would i use? Would a car battery/cigarette lighter type be ok? Obviously, I'll do my research too but i'm just trying to gather and retain info in the right order at the minute :ROFLMAO:
 

colinmd

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If you have no idea of the set up in your van you need to go to a workshop that does vehicle (preferably motorhome) electrics . There is no such thing as a 'standard' set up as different vans have different setups.
I suspect you will be able to charge it from the on board charger, but this will require some form of hook up to the charger.
 

sueant08

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If you have no idea of the set up in your van you need to go to a workshop that does vehicle (preferably motorhome) electrics . There is no such thing as a 'standard' set up as different vans have different setups.
I suspect you will be able to charge it from the on board charger, but this will require some form of hook up to the charger.
Ah, ok. thank you.
 

harrow

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Thak you. The battery that the Canoe motor manufactures recommends is a lead acid 12v deep cycle marine battery with at least 105amp.
My knowledge of electricity and batteries is very limited, but are you saying I may be able to just charge a battery like this through my 12v socket on my motorhome wall panel? And if so, what type of charger would i use? Would a car battery/cigarette lighter type be ok? Obviously, I'll do my research too but i'm just trying to gather and retain info in the right order at the minute :ROFLMAO:
No simpler than that if the canoe battery battery had terminals then some cheap jump leads, a battery/cigarette lighter type might/will have too smaller fuse to charge that battery.

cigarette lighters are all right for charging mobile phone but that is about their limit.

I expect the canoe battery battery might have some sort of moulded plug, you will have to investigate ?
 

mistericeman

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If it was me and assuming it's a typical 12v lead acid battery...

I'd be looking at a 240v 'smart' multi stage charger AND a small inverter to power it (for when away from hook up)
Obviously if you're on hook up you can plug the charger direct into 240v.

A multi stage charger will ensure you maximise charging AND look after the battery best.
 

colinmd

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I would say, if you want to charge the battery when on mains and want a easy set up then you could get a plug in mains charger, but it's not good practice to charge a lead/acid battery inside a van without the correct ventilation.
 

molly 2

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If on hook up charge from mains use a low amp charger , with ventilation should be safe . battery choice is down to you and your budget ,100 amp from about £60 to about £900 , another factor is weight the heavier a lead acid the better quantity. 100 amp about 23 klg . To charge of grid you would need a 100 amp portable solar panel or a solar set up on your van
 

mjvw

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I have a auxiliary leisure battery in the van this is charged when on Hook up at home or campsite by a milenco-optimate-10-battery-charger, by plunging into a 240V Standard socket in the van. I don't leave it charging overnight just as an extra safety measure, also the battery is a AGM gel type.
 

colinmd

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I have a auxiliary leisure battery in the van this is charged when on Hook up at home or campsite by a milenco-optimate-10-battery-charger, by plunging into a 240V Standard socket in the van. I don't leave it charging overnight just as an extra safety measure, also the battery is a AGM gel type.
The 'problem' with a charger like that, is if the battery is well discharged as might well happen if the canoe is used for some time, then you are looking at 15hours to recharge it.
 

mjvw

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Yes it may take a long time to charge but it suits my needs, the charger it's self has pulled other batteries out of a very deep state of discharge when normal chargers have refused to work. I was pointing out that I do charge a battery in the van via 240v when on hook up and have had no issues. :)
I don't use the spare battery for a canoe but as a back up for when the main leisure gets low.
 

trevskoda

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Set of jump starter cables from you les battery to marine bat will work ok,marine batteries are the same as so called les batts but dont cycle them down more that half way or there life will be short,oh and run you engine when charging on jump leads,make sure no gas or sparks,always wear protective specks when working with batts and have a bucket of water handy,i almost lost my face once to a explosion in workshop.
 

landoboguy

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you dont have to use just a battery, (sometimes you may need 2 batteries for if your first runs out) you can go for a 12v power pack with decent juice. Much easier to carry and charge all in one safely, when on EHU, or even when on solar/invertor
similar to this guy

 

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