The end of win seven

GeoffL

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[...]
My preferred browser is and has been Opera, for over a decade. But to fuel your paranoia it is nowadays based on Chrome, owned by a Chinese consortium, and the built-in VPN service is provided by Google.
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:eek: I didn't realise that Opera was now Chinese or that it's based on Chrome. I checked and, sure enough, it was sold to a Chinese consortium in 2016. AFAICT, the VPN is provided by SurfEasy (not Google). Doing "whois surfeasy.com" suggests that SurfEasy is owned by Symantec (who IIRC also do Norton security products). However, I suppose it's vaguely possible that Google could have embedded key logging etc. in the version of Chrome upon which Opera is based and there's still the issue that (I assume) Opera's servers are at the end of the VPN tunnel and so have access to everything in unencrypted form.
 

mjvw

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Just an open question is everyone comfortable with VPN's i certainly would not use a free VPN could be open to the "man in the middle" scenario.
 

trevskoda

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Just an open question is everyone comfortable with VPN's i certainly would not use a free VPN could be open to the "man in the middle" scenario.
Your right,in last mth linux mag they say even linux can be spy/hacked using VPN,s but there is a way in linux to switch on a reverse mirror so the spying just gets bounced back,dont ask me how to do as way over my head as yet. :cry:
One other thing i found out from my mate is android phones can be switched on from satelite and pinned down,thats how the USA nailed the army camander a few weeks back at the airport,so dont to anything naughty or you never know. :eek: 😂 😂 😂
 

GeoffL

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Just an open question is everyone comfortable with VPN's i certainly would not use a free VPN could be open to the "man in the middle" scenario.
It depends on your reason for using the VPN and how much you feel you can trust the provider. If you don't want the Government (via your ISP) or another "man in the middle" to be able to snoop on you then having everything go encrypted via an organisation that isn't required to log your every move might be a good idea. Also if you have a home network that you need to access while touring, a VPN is essential to make your (remote) computer part of your home network.

That said, there are two types of VPN from a user's point of view: the first is an encrypted tunnel between you and a VPN provider, who decrypt your traffic and forward it onto the destinations you request. This type is intended to provide some privacy and also to 'spoof' your location (for example, so that you can access UK-only content from outside the UK). The second is a tunnel between a LAN and either another LAN or a single computer. This (for example) lets you securely access content on a home network while touring; or connect geographically remote locations so they appear to be a single, private network. While I might be suspicious of free VPNs of the first type, I have no qualms about one free version of the second as OpenVPN is rock solid and there's no "man in the middle" with access to your data in unencrypted form.
 

mjvw

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It depends on your reason for using the VPN and how much you feel you can trust the provider. If you don't want the Government (via your ISP) or another "man in the middle" to be able to snoop on you then having everything go encrypted via an organisation that isn't required to log your every move might be a good idea. Also if you have a home network that you need to access while touring, a VPN is essential to make your (remote) computer part of your home network.

That said, there are two types of VPN from a user's point of view: the first is an encrypted tunnel between you and a VPN provider, who decrypt your traffic and forward it onto the destinations you request. This type is intended to provide some privacy and also to 'spoof' your location (for example, so that you can access UK-only content from outside the UK). The second is a tunnel between a LAN and either another LAN or a single computer. This (for example) lets you securely access content on a home network while touring; or connect geographically remote locations so they appear to be a single, private network. While I might be suspicious of free VPNs of the first type, I have no qualms about one free version of the second as OpenVPN is rock solid and there's no "man in the middle" with access to your data in unencrypted form.
Thanks i don't really need a VPN but was really interested what the rest of the community thought. And if a VPN is a good idea if travelling full time or long term?
 

Sharpie

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:eek: I didn't realise that Opera was now Chinese or that it's based on Chrome. I checked and, sure enough, it was sold to a Chinese consortium in 2016. AFAICT, the VPN is provided by SurfEasy (not Google). Doing "whois surfeasy.com" suggests that SurfEasy is owned by Symantec (who IIRC also do Norton security products). However, I suppose it's vaguely possible that Google could have embedded key logging etc. in the version of Chrome upon which Opera is based and there's still the issue that (I assume) Opera's servers are at the end of the VPN tunnel and so have access to everything in unencrypted form.
I'm pretty sure that Opera's VPN used to be provided by Google (actually I know that it was) and was speedy. Now I've looked again you are correct, they've changed to SurfEasy around 2018 and it has deteriorated.

Some food for thought: https://www.tomsguide.com/us/opera-vpn,review-4496.html

Man in the middle is the obvious risk with third party VPNs. As opposed to secure corporate VPNs running their own servers. But they also usually do their own monitoring to ensure that you are using them for business, not idling work time away on other things.

But for many, who just want to access say streaming video and audio services in territories where they are blocked, they have a use.

I do still have a use for Opera's "free" VPN.

As for "it's free" well no nothing comes for free, all sorts of business models for "free" things, be they browsers, VPNs, social media, operating systems etc. They have to monetise this stuff one way or another.

As with this forum, which is very straightforward, if you value something, pay for it.
 

GeoffL

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FWIW, I've made use of stuff in the past that's been offered for free with no guarantees so that the vendor has a vehicle to test their products 'in the wild'. I wonder whether SurfEasy provide their VPN to the Opera community for this purpose. I've only used it for low-bandwidth interaction and so can't comment how speedy it is for streaming video etc.
 

sparrks

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Doing the set up you have to change to english uk,my duck works fab over firefox.
I've found out what was causing the issue, as you commented about not seeing properly - where the list of results are displayed under the DDG search box is a little region box with UK as the default which just needs clicking to on........
 

trevskoda

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Reading through this thread I feel the same as I do watching University Challenge when I don't understand the question let alone know the answer.
Some of it is over my head to,lucky i have a mate how knows his stuff as he was responsible for over 500 gov dep computers and servers,if im stuck i give him a bell though i dont like bothering folk and do try to work things out,bit tricky for a dumb conut.
 

trevskoda

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:eek: I didn't realise that Opera was now Chinese or that it's based on Chrome. I checked and, sure enough, it was sold to a Chinese consortium in 2016. AFAICT, the VPN is provided by SurfEasy (not Google). Doing "whois surfeasy.com" suggests that SurfEasy is owned by Symantec (who IIRC also do Norton security products). However, I suppose it's vaguely possible that Google could have embedded key logging etc. in the version of Chrome upon which Opera is based and there's still the issue that (I assume) Opera's servers are at the end of the VPN tunnel and so have access to everything in unencrypted form.
The chinese turfed M/S out and now run linux as do the ruskys kalin is there distro.
 

trevskoda

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Would you use Deepin ? The Chinese distro?
Never tried it but seen it on the line up,i use lite because i have been on it from 2.4 back in the 32 bit days,anyway whats wrong with a chinese,tast nice,oh and there food is good to.
 

bartman

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You can use a program called unet boot in,this has to be put on a pen drive along with the distro,or you can use a usb dvd disc drive unit,some very old pc/laptops do not let you boot from usb.
I dont use the pen method as i have not sorted it in my head yet but a mate of mine who is well up on these things did show me how to do once but my brain died soon after,must go through it again.
Well Trev, I have an ancient Toshiba netbook so I thought I'd give this a try - and so far so good. I had previously tried an earlier Linux distro on it, but it was still painfully slow - but so far this looks better.
I had a bit of grief trying to get it onto a bootable usb, the utility suggested on the place I downloaded Zorin from nearly killed my usb drive, made it unrecogisable on any of my PCs. I had to download and use a low level utility to format it. Anyway, I eventually used unetboot as you suggest and it worked.
One thing to note for those using a bootable usb drive is that the bios in the netbook didn't give an option to boot from usb until I had a usb stick plugged into it which was properly bootable.
 

trevskoda

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Well Trev, I have an ancient Toshiba netbook so I thought I'd give this a try - and so far so good. I had previously tried an earlier Linux distro on it, but it was still painfully slow - but so far this looks better.
I had a bit of grief trying to get it onto a bootable usb, the utility suggested on the place I downloaded Zorin from nearly killed my usb drive, made it unrecogisable on any of my PCs. I had to download and use a low level utility to format it. Anyway, I eventually used unetboot as you suggest and it worked.
One thing to note for those using a bootable usb drive is that the bios in the netbook didn't give an option to boot from usb until I had a usb stick plugged into it which was properly bootable.
Thanks for letting me know as i have a chaps l/top do reboot this week and its only got a cd drive rather than a dvd drive.
 

trevskoda

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Well Trev, I have an ancient Toshiba netbook so I thought I'd give this a try - and so far so good. I had previously tried an earlier Linux distro on it, but it was still painfully slow - but so far this looks better.
I had a bit of grief trying to get it onto a bootable usb, the utility suggested on the place I downloaded Zorin from nearly killed my usb drive, made it unrecogisable on any of my PCs. I had to download and use a low level utility to format it. Anyway, I eventually used unetboot as you suggest and it worked.
One thing to note for those using a bootable usb drive is that the bios in the netbook didn't give an option to boot from usb until I had a usb stick plugged into it which was properly bootable.
Use dark iwata for bottom panel and change icons to i think the top iwata,right click thunderbird mail and set to panel,it will now be at far right,right click and drag over beside firefox at left so now both you mail and net are handy without having to always open the menu,do hope you have fun with zorin and once you get on top of linux all the main distros sort of work the same.
Remember you add ones are at left bottom panel and last right icon to open. (y)
 

bartman

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Use dark iwata for bottom panel and change icons to i think the top iwata,right click thunderbird mail and set to panel,it will now be at far right,right click and drag over beside firefox at left so now both you mail and net are handy without having to always open the menu,do hope you have fun with zorin and once you get on top of linux all the main distros sort of work the same.
Remember you add ones are at left bottom panel and last right icon to open. (y)
Sorted out Thunderbird Ok, been using that for years. As for the other bits you mentioned, I know your keyboard has a language of its own but what is "iwata"? :)
 

trevskoda

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Sorted out Thunderbird Ok, been using that for years. As for the other bits you mentioned, I know your keyboard has a language of its own but what is "iwata"? :)
When you open screen or icons in settings you will find colour and style ,iwata dark ,lite and many others,best with dark iwata on bottom panel which is easy on the eye rather that gray/white,also change the icon size/colour or theme ,they all have funny names,you will get it after a short time,have fun and tinker as in the end it will be well worth learning linux. (y)
apperance.png
 

trevskoda

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Bartman i hope you are sorted and any other who have had a go with zorin or other distros,after a short time most of the names for programmes and stuff will fall into place,good thing is its a 5 year cycle which means once on the pc no more faffing about,many distros have only a six mth cycle which require drawing of data and rebooting to a new distro,many more do a 5 year cycle and some do a rolling release so no rebootinf at all.
 

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