Rented house electrical safety..any sparks please

jagmanx

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Is there a house electrician out there who could advise please
My house rental needs attention 1

I have a 2 part quote to rectify problems
Part 1 is a minor task to make safe and has to be done..I am happy with that

Part 2 is to replace the consumer unit which is not planned/needed

The consumer unit was replaced 9 years ago as part of a solar panel installation and in my opinion is OK

I would prefer to provide full details by "conversation please"
 

st3v3

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and in my opinion is OK
LOL.

The trouble you've got is that it doesn't meet the current regs (should be metal at the very least.) The fact that it doesn't meet the regs may be interpreted as not being suitable by the insurance company. As the spark has to list it on the inspection report, you're potentially screwed because it will be the first thing the insurance ask to see.

How much is he quoting to change it?
 

caledonia

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Had to replace consumer units in both houses we bought as rental investment. Not that expensive.
 

sparrks

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If you are completing an Electrical Installation Condition Report (EICR) from 1st January 2016 and the plastic consumer unit is not underneath a staircase or not within the only route of escape and the connections inside the consumer unit are satisfactory, then it doesn’t need to be commented on. However, if plastic consumer units are underneath a wooden staircase or within the only route of escape from the property, then it needs to be noted on the report.
 

jagmanx

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Thanks all for your replies
The consumer unit is in a metal cupboard in the Garage (attached to the house)

I am quite happy with the "must be done job as follows

Option: 1 C1/C2
Electrical Remedial Works Following Electrical Report Works in scope:
Seal consumer unit exposed entries with intumescent mastic
Supply and install a new wiring enclosure and new 13a fcu for the garage floodlight connections
Supply and install a replacement metalclad socket outlet in the garage
Rewire the porch light in externally rated cable Issue an Electrical Minor Works Certificate for remedial works from report: 109383

COST £340 No problem with this ..already authorised

THEN WE MIGHT HAVE
Option 2

C3 Electrical Remedial Works Following Electrical Report Works in scope:
Supply and install a high integrity consumer unit to include:
Dual 30mA RCD protection for general circuits 30mA
RCBO protection for the ground floor socket circuit
Surge protection device Meter tails and gland Issue an Electrical Installation Certificate and building control notification for remedial works from report: 10938363

This is costed at £815 and is not planned
as I said the existing consuumer unit was newly installed 9 years ago

I do not treat Electrical safety lightly (Ha Ha)
Thr Company who did the survey righly insist on Option 1

Further thoughts on option 2 would be useful please
As a responsible landlord I always agree to necessary and desirable maintenance ! (and more..eg new carpeting)
 
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jagmanx

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PS It appears to me I might save maybe £150 by getting both options done together

So will option 2 "rear up again" in 2 years time when the property is re-inspected /
option 1.JPG
option 2.JPG
 
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jagmanx

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Thanks
Not sure Steve cannot easily find out but I will ask the house agent for more detail/photo

As you note the electrics are deemed ok without needing to do the work in the 2nd quote !
The company are aware it is a rental property and the have not even suggested the 2nd quote is advisable

I think it might work out cheaper if I get all the items done at the same time

I have asked for an all in one quote
 

wildebus

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LOL.

The trouble you've got is that it doesn't meet the current regs (should be metal at the very least.) The fact that it doesn't meet the regs may be interpreted as not being suitable by the insurance company. As the spark has to list it on the inspection report, you're potentially screwed because it will be the first thing the insurance ask to see.

How much is he quoting to change it?
Does the installation not just need to meet the regulations that were current at the time of install? I bet very few houses have Metal CUs.
 

jagmanx

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Does the installation not just need to meet the regulations that were current at the time of install? I bet very few houses have Metal CUs.
Maybe ?
I am confident the Consumer unit is/was installed correcly at the time and in line with existing regulations
I upgraded to a new unit with renting the house in mind..I paid extra for a new consumer unit.
The initial electricla inspection in 2013 included minor tasks.
I am quite content that times have changed and the upgrades as in option 1 are needed
We need to await photos etc
 

st3v3

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Does the installation not just need to meet the regulations that were current at the time of install?
I don't think so. With that argument we could all still have re-wireable fuses...

It's more about the insurance being void than anything else.
 

wildebus

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I don't think so. With that argument we could all still have re-wireable fuses...

It's more about the insurance being void than anything else.
not really, unless the house was from the 70's or older - and it if was, it would still be legal to have them anyway (what is legal and what is recommended don't always match up).
Some Regs are counter-productive as well ... the change to having an RCD on both sides of the split-CU means if a light blows, instead of just tripping an MCD, it trips the RCD, taking every lighting circuit down. Is that 'improvement' safer?
 

st3v3

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not really, unless the house was from the 70's or older - and it if was, it would still be legal to have them anyway (what is legal and what is recommended don't always match up).
Some Regs are counter-productive as well ... the change to having an RCD on both sides of the split-CU means if a light blows, instead of just tripping an MCD, it trips the RCD, taking every lighting circuit down. Is that 'improvement' safer?
You're quite right. Most people will fit single RCBO's on every circuit now (which I'm surprised wasn't in the quote given above BTW)
 

jagmanx

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At the moment it seems Option 1 is both needed and enough.
As discussed option 2 may incur unwanted breakouts.
No decision as yet await photos and more from letting agent
 

jagmanx

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Latest inidication is that Quote/option 1 is sufficient.
But I await confirmation.
 

jagmanx

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Confirmation from the electrical contractor/safety check
The first quote is sufficient (C1/C2)
So I will go with that..
Fully expecting to need to do the option 2 when the next check is done. Probably 5 years !
 
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