GP, asked to buy Blood Pressure Monitor, Oximeter Blood & thermometer

Nabsim

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The Health app on iPhones can collect all sorts of data. You can buy separate Bluetooth monitoring kit or enter data manually. Brilliant bit of kit. The new iwatch also has full ecg rather than just pulse and advanced fall detection. It will automatically send out messages with your location if needs be.
Of course it is expensive unfortunately.

Caz has just bought an app on the advice of her diabetic nurse, wasn’t much at just under a fiver but doesn’t seem as good as the free apps. I did try to get her to use one that talks to the Health app but costs it was from diabetic nurse she wouldn’t. NHS and IT just don’t fit together
 

colinmd

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The new digital thermometer arrived today (we had an old one but it is years old) :)

The doctor phoned my wife yesterday, blood tests say you need vitamin b12 @ 1mg and you can guess the next bit, buy it yourself, went to Boots the chemist, they said no specialist item we don't do them.

My wife used to have a b12 injection every 3 months, GP says were not allowed to do that anymore :oops:

Its become like doctor google and trying to buy things online :mad:
Our GP (and I guess many, if not all others) will not give prescriptions for 'over the counter' items, as these are available for low prices both online and in chemists I have no problem with that, the alternative is to issue a prescription which would end up costing the NHS more than the cost of item. However I do fear that this might possibly end up with many more drugs made non prescription purely to save costs.
 

mariesnowgoose

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The new digital thermometer arrived today (we had an old one but it is years old) :)

The doctor phoned my wife yesterday, blood tests say you need vitamin b12 @ 1mg and you can guess the next bit, buy it yourself, went to Boots the chemist, they said no specialist item we don't do them.

My wife used to have a b12 injection every 3 months, GP says were not allowed to do that anymore :oops:

Its become like doctor google and trying to buy things online :mad:
Ian, is your wife old enough to get free prescriptions?
If she is I would go right back to your GP and push to get it on prescription.

If he's told her she needs it then he's obliged to prescribe it, imo.
Unless she pays for her prescriptions and it might actually be cheaper for her to buy over the counter?
If it isn't cheaper over the counter then there is no valid reason for the GP not to prescribe it, unless he is just trying to save his practice money?

I get my vitamin D free on prescription, but that's because I'm lucky enough to have a sh*t hot oncologist! ;) (y)

Your doctor could also be fobbing you off about the injections.
See this extract below from the current NHS website and point the lazy/tight fisted sods in the same direction.
If you get no joy try your nearest Holland & Barrett, their staff are well up on what you need.

Full link here: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vitamin-b12-or-folate-deficiency-anaemia/treatment/

Treatment- Vitamin B12 or folate deficiency anaemia
Contents
  1. Overview
  2. Symptoms
  3. Causes
  4. Diagnosis
  5. Treatment
  6. Complications
The treatment for vitamin B12 or folate deficiency anaemia depends on what's causing the condition. Most people can be easily treated with injections or tablets to replace the missing vitamins.

Treating vitamin B12 deficiency anaemia
Vitamin B12 deficiency anaemia is usually treated with injections of vitamin B12.
There are 2 types of vitamin B12 injections:
  • hydroxocobalamin
  • cyanocobalamin
Hydroxocobalamin is usually the recommended option as it stays in the body for longer.
At first, you'll have these injections every other day for 2 weeks or until your symptoms have started improving.
Your GP or nurse will give the injections.
After this initial period, your treatment will depend on whether the cause of your vitamin B12 deficiency is related to your diet or whether the deficiency is causing any neurological problems, such as problems with thinking, memory and behaviour.
The most common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency in the UK is pernicious anaemia, which is not related to your diet.

Diet-related

If your vitamin B12 deficiency is caused by a lack of the vitamin in your diet, you may be prescribed vitamin B12 tablets to take every day between meals.

Or you may need to have an injection of hydroxocobalamin twice a year.
People who find it difficult to get enough vitamin B12 in their diets, such as those following a vegan diet, may need vitamin B12 tablets for life.
Although it's less common, people with vitamin B12 deficiency caused by a prolonged poor diet may be advised to stop taking the tablets once their vitamin B12 levels have returned to normal and their diet has improved.
Good sources of vitamin B12 include:
  • meat
  • salmon and cod
  • milk and other dairy products
  • eggs
 

colinmd

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Ian, is your wife old enough to get free prescriptions?
If she is I would go right back to your GP and push to get it on prescription.

If he's told her she needs it then he's obliged to prescribe it, imo.
Unless she pays for her prescriptions and it might actually be cheaper for her to buy over the counter?
If it isn't cheaper over the counter then there is no valid reason for the GP not to prescribe it, unless he is just trying to save his practice money?

I get my vitamin D free on prescription, but that's because I'm lucky enough to have a sh*t hot oncologist! ;) (y)

Your doctor could also be fobbing you off about the injections.
See this extract below from the current NHS website and point the lazy/tight fisted sods in the same direction.
If you get no joy try your nearest Holland & Barrett, their staff are well up on what you need.

Full link here: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vitamin-b12-or-folate-deficiency-anaemia/treatment/

Treatment- Vitamin B12 or folate deficiency anaemia
Contents
  1. Overview
  2. Symptoms
  3. Causes
  4. Diagnosis
  5. Treatment
  6. Complications
The treatment for vitamin B12 or folate deficiency anaemia depends on what's causing the condition. Most people can be easily treated with injections or tablets to replace the missing vitamins.

Treating vitamin B12 deficiency anaemia
Vitamin B12 deficiency anaemia is usually treated with injections of vitamin B12.
There are 2 types of vitamin B12 injections:
  • hydroxocobalamin
  • cyanocobalamin
Hydroxocobalamin is usually the recommended option as it stays in the body for longer.
At first, you'll have these injections every other day for 2 weeks or until your symptoms have started improving.
Your GP or nurse will give the injections.
After this initial period, your treatment will depend on whether the cause of your vitamin B12 deficiency is related to your diet or whether the deficiency is causing any neurological problems, such as problems with thinking, memory and behaviour.
The most common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency in the UK is pernicious anaemia, which is not related to your diet.

Diet-related

If your vitamin B12 deficiency is caused by a lack of the vitamin in your diet, you may be prescribed vitamin B12 tablets to take every day between meals.

Or you may need to have an injection of hydroxocobalamin twice a year.
People who find it difficult to get enough vitamin B12 in their diets, such as those following a vegan diet, may need vitamin B12 tablets for life.
Although it's less common, people with vitamin B12 deficiency caused by a prolonged poor diet may be advised to stop taking the tablets once their vitamin B12 levels have returned to normal and their diet has improved.
Good sources of vitamin B12 include:
  • meat
  • salmon and cod
  • milk and other dairy products
  • eggs
The proscribing of B12 depends on circumstances, cancer patients usually get it on prescription, but if it's deemed due to diet it's not available on prescription.
 

harrow

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Ian, is your wife old enough to get free prescriptions?
If she is I would go right back to your GP and push to get it on prescription.

If he's told her she needs it then he's obliged to prescribe it, imo.
Unless she pays for her prescriptions and it might actually be cheaper for her to buy over the counter?
If it isn't cheaper over the counter then there is no valid reason for the GP not to prescribe it, unless he is just trying to save his practice money?

I get my vitamin D free on prescription, but that's because I'm lucky enough to have a sh*t hot oncologist! ;) (y)

Your doctor could also be fobbing you off about the injections.
See this extract below from the current NHS website and point the lazy/tight fisted sods in the same direction.
If you get no joy try your nearest Holland & Barrett, their staff are well up on what you need.

Full link here: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vitamin-b12-or-folate-deficiency-anaemia/treatment/

Treatment- Vitamin B12 or folate deficiency anaemia
Contents
  1. Overview
  2. Symptoms
  3. Causes
  4. Diagnosis
  5. Treatment
  6. Complications
The treatment for vitamin B12 or folate deficiency anaemia depends on what's causing the condition. Most people can be easily treated with injections or tablets to replace the missing vitamins.

Treating vitamin B12 deficiency anaemia
Vitamin B12 deficiency anaemia is usually treated with injections of vitamin B12.
There are 2 types of vitamin B12 injections:
  • hydroxocobalamin
  • cyanocobalamin
Hydroxocobalamin is usually the recommended option as it stays in the body for longer.
At first, you'll have these injections every other day for 2 weeks or until your symptoms have started improving.
Your GP or nurse will give the injections.
After this initial period, your treatment will depend on whether the cause of your vitamin B12 deficiency is related to your diet or whether the deficiency is causing any neurological problems, such as problems with thinking, memory and behaviour.
The most common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency in the UK is pernicious anaemia, which is not related to your diet.

Diet-related

If your vitamin B12 deficiency is caused by a lack of the vitamin in your diet, you may be prescribed vitamin B12 tablets to take every day between meals.

Or you may need to have an injection of hydroxocobalamin twice a year.
People who find it difficult to get enough vitamin B12 in their diets, such as those following a vegan diet, may need vitamin B12 tablets for life.
Although it's less common, people with vitamin B12 deficiency caused by a prolonged poor diet may be advised to stop taking the tablets once their vitamin B12 levels have returned to normal and their diet has improved.
Good sources of vitamin B12 include:
  • meat
  • salmon and cod
  • milk and other dairy products
  • eggs
Marie your an angel :)

My wife is a normal meat eater and had been on B12 injections every 3 months for a few years.

The same GP in the practice stopped the injections and of course her B12 levels have now gone low.

I also buy vitamin D tablets for her because she also needs them.

We are going to try eating more liver and see if she turns into, Hannibal Lecter

 

r4dent

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My daughter is a senior partner in a large GP practice. Before CV19 reached UK she told me to get Blood Pressure Monitor, blood oximeter & a thermometer.
She said that visits would become online only and that the devices could become difficult to get. She was advising her patients to do the same.
 

mariesnowgoose

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The proscribing of B12 depends on circumstances, cancer patients usually get it on prescription, but if it's deemed due to diet it's not available on prescription.
"The most common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency in the UK is pernicious anaemia, which is not related to your diet."

Don't know if this is the case with Ian's wife, but sounds likely?
 

harrow

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"The most common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency in the UK is pernicious anaemia, which is not related to your diet."

Don't know if this is the case with Ian's wife, but sounds likely?
Marie thats correct, pernicious anaemia.
 

QFour

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People seem to think that our Health Service is made of money. If your health is at risk get what you need. If it was needed for the MH it would be different. We are living in strange times. You cannot go down to the surgery but if you are really desperate you could go to A&E I am sure they would love to do your BP for you.
 

gipsy_jo

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we are very fortunate in the Uk we drive around in lovely nice motor homes and then complain about buying a 99p+ Item that can help us, you not happy here with the Dr's go and live in another country and stop whinging you'll soon be back here I promise you
 

yorkslass

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People seem to think that our Health Service is made of money. If your health is at risk get what you need. If it was needed for the MH it would be different. We are living in strange times. You cannot go down to the surgery but if you are really desperate you could go to A&E I am sure they would love to do your BP for you.
we are very fortunate in the Uk we drive around in lovely nice motor homes and then complain about buying a 99p+ Item that can help us, you not happy here with the Dr's go and live in another country and stop whinging you'll soon be back here I promise you
What we may have is not the issue.
What about those who are needing help from food banks? They havn't got spare money to buy anything.
 

QFour

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we are very fortunate in the Uk we drive around in lovely nice motor homes and then complain about buying a 99p+ Item that can help us, you not happy here with the Dr's go and live in another country and stop whinging you'll soon be back here I promise you
You are correct. First question asked in Spanish Medical Centre is. EHIC / Insurance. Over here they treat everyone even those who have come because they are ill. One guy we met came back to the Uk from Turkey after having a heart attach. Checked out the hospital and got on a plane to the Uk. Perhaps the OP should change Doctors if he is not happy. After all they are trying to protect themselves and others.
 

Robmac

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You are a weird lot on here. :oops:

I get 4 'likes' because I am in A&E and only yorkslass has a bit of sympathy for my predicament (thanks Sue). If I had snuffed it I suppose I would have got :ROFLMAO: instead. ☺ ☺
Sorry Jim it did feel a little odd giving you a like for your post!

Hope you are sorted mate.
 

mariesnowgoose

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People seem to think that our Health Service is made of money. If your health is at risk get what you need. If it was needed for the MH it would be different. We are living in strange times. You cannot go down to the surgery but if you are really desperate you could go to A&E I am sure they would love to do your BP for you.
we are very fortunate in the Uk we drive around in lovely nice motor homes and then complain about buying a 99p+ Item that can help us, you not happy here with the Dr's go and live in another country and stop whinging you'll soon be back here I promise you
The fact that you are all driving round in nice motorhomes, it's a reasonable assumption that a large section of the members can easily afford to pay for supplementary health gizmos & tablets. However, it also suggests that you might never experienced being on the bones of your *rse or a very low income, or if you have you've long forgotten about it. It's the smugness of assumptions being made about everyone outside of your own cosy bubbles that is quite alien to me.

I always remind myself of the following idiom, and GinaRon said the same on another topic in another thread just a few days ago:-
"Before you judge a man, walk a mile in his shoes"

Gipsy_jo is spot on, mind. The miserliness of some folk on this forum when they genuinely don't need to be, literally to save pennies or a couple of quid, I sometimes find quite amusing. Plus the last time I heard, shrouds still ain't got no pockets...! ;)(y)

Our NHS is not actually free, btw, and I wish people would stop saying it is. Unless I've misunderstood what National Insurance is for all my life?
And if you have complaints about non-UK residents abusing our 'free' health system, then lobby the government to stop this happening. Perhaps we need to adopt the same approach that other countries have for healthcare when you travel abroad?
 

QFour

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And if you have complaints about non-UK residents abusing our 'free' health system, then lobby the government to stop this happening. Perhaps we need to adopt the same approach that other countries have for healthcare when you travel abroad?
There is a scheme that does this but until the NHS staff get used to making sure that people are covered like they do in other countries the tax payer is going to be out of pocket and also missing out on treatment because others have got there first. Couple of years ago someone ran up a bill for thousands of ££ because the baby she delivered while here on holiday was in intensive care for months. No insurance and no funds. Perhaps they should ask at the point of entry if you have insurance.

To others from outside the Uk our health service is FREE as they have never paid anything into it. They just arrive and head for the Hospital.

Perhaps we should all have ID Cards then you can just show your card and get treatment BUT the Human Rights lobby and other organisations don't like that because they think BIG BROTHER is watching. He is but I am not that bothered by it.
 

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