5052 marine grade alloy fuel tank repair, required.

runnach

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One for boating members.

Had a look at 2.3t mm alloy tank requiring repair. Various areas of tank are badly pitted, bottom pitted badly. Wonder if any boating fraternity member has attempted this kind of repair?

Personally, I have suggested either a new tank than repair, as 2.3t mm not the best to weld, especially as material will be contaminated with fuel (pertrol) and salt water ingress, which will make it a mare to repair. I also mentioned probably cheapest option is to source a marine grade fuel bladder.

Thoughts?
 

zzr1400tim

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aluminum welding is a "black art" especially thin gauge stuff
my thoughts..
bin it and get a new plastic tank.
 

Fazerloz

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Is the bad pitting inside or out. If inside you could end up chasing your arse all over the bottom of the tank. The material is nothing special. If the tank is out I would think cut out and replace if its bad. The test pressure isn't worth talking about.

Properties
Alloy 5052-H32 has a range of useful properties:
Decorative Finish
Hard Wearing
Non-Slip
Corrosion Resistant
Low Maintenance
Anti-Static
Light-weight

Applications
Amongst the applications for Alloy 5052 are:
Treadplate
Boilermaking
Containers
Nameplates
Road Signs
Architectural Paneling
Welded Tubes
Chemical Industry
Irrigation
Desalination units
Pressure Vessels
Rivets
 

Scotia

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Cut the panel out leaving a lip then weld a plate to the lip, you could fix the patch using cleco pins to stop the patch warping when tacking in place then weld the hole after. I dont have any marine grade alloy but may have some 3mm alloy, rod wise i've 5% silicone and also a 5% mag rod.
 

runnach

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Is the bad pitting inside or out. If inside you could end up chasing your arse all over the bottom of the tank. The material is nothing special. If the tank is out I would think cut out and replace if its bad. The test pressure isn't worth talking about.

Properties
Alloy 5052-H32 has a range of useful properties:
Decorative Finish
Hard Wearing
Non-Slip
Corrosion Resistant
Low Maintenance
Anti-Static
Light-weight

Applications
Amongst the applications for Alloy 5052 are:
Treadplate
Boilermaking
Containers
Nameplates
Road Signs
Architectural Paneling
Welded Tubes
Chemical Industry
Irrigation
Desalination units
Pressure Vessels
Rivets
Faz, can only view tank externally, no internal access apart from fuel in/out. Pitting looks more to be external. In or out, I would say one off of those jobs where chasing could turn into a marathon, weld fill with water, hydraulic test, another leak appears somewhere else!!!!
 

runnach

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Cut the panel out leaving a lip then weld a plate to the lip, you could fix the patch using cleco pins to stop the patch warping when tacking in place then weld the hole after. I dont have any marine grade alloy but may have some 3mm alloy, rod wise i've 5% silicone and also a 5% mag rod.
Hi Sam, too many areas affected, for a 29 year old tank (spec plate) it has served well. Obviously any patches will require to be done with 5000 series grade al/al, I can access 7000 series, but not recommended mixing, so lesser grade definitely a no no.

I have some 6043's @ 2.5 and 3.2 dia here at home. I'll speak to the guy tomorrow and recommend his best options are either another brand new tank, if me, I would replace with a bladder fuel tank.
 

trevskoda

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A poor tank with no ins hole to clean and get rid of water.
either replace with plastic or blast and cover with grp,alloy should have been blasted from new and painted with food grade epoxy,never a zink epoxy on alloy,good luck terry.
 

runnach

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A poor tank with no ins hole to clean and get rid of water.
either replace with plastic or blast and cover with grp,alloy should have been blasted from new and painted with food grade epoxy,never a zink epoxy on alloy,good luck terry.
I would have thought anodising would have been a better and extra added corrosion preventative when tank was first manufactured.
 

trevskoda

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I would have thought anodising would have been a better and extra added corrosion preventative when tank was first manufactured.
Never seen tanks anodised,any i was ask to do had a food grade epoxy on spec sheets.
 

Fazerloz

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If you decide to do it i would go with some 4043s a bit more forgiving on the cracking front and no real need for max strength. The tank will not be exposed to the elements will it. If so 5356s but i am sure you know all this anyway. Have fun. (y) ;)
 

jagmanx

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No knowledge but either the bladder solution for me
OR a new tank !. better long term ?
 

Scotia

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Hi Sam, too many areas affected, for a 29 year old tank (spec plate) it has served well. Obviously any patches will require to be done with 5000 series grade al/al, I can access 7000 series, but not recommended mixing, so lesser grade definitely a no no.

I have some 6043's @ 2.5 and 3.2 dia here at home. I'll speak to the guy tomorrow and recommend his best options are either another brand new tank, if me, I would replace with a bladder fuel tank.
The tank must be from the Ark it's H14 that i have H22 is best for boat use but both have good corrosion resistance H22 being better suited for salt water, the patch i was referring to was the side top or bottom panel not small individual pieces. Is it for petrol or diesel?
 

runnach

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Sam, tank holds petrol. Anyhooooooo, I suggested to owner he looks at bladder fuel tank first, second, a new build with not much changes from 2k.

Original not worth repairing, be chasing holes till next year. I'm walking away from this one.
 

SquirrellCook

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If you had been close to me I'd have taken a look at it. I weld thin aluminium on a regular basis.
If you look the motorhome builder site "violating a princess" there are various pictures of my "Betty" build.
 

trevskoda

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Shotblast and grp was ok on the old petrol but softens with the new sh-t they sell us now,best to walk away.
 

witzend

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Just seen this thread on several occasions I've successfully glued patchs on engine sumps + fuel tanks and valve guides into alloy cylinder heads using Araldite 2 part glue following the instructions on the tubes to the letter not ever had a failure so far
 

SquirrellCook

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Just seen this thread on several occasions I've successfully glued patchs on engine sumps + fuel tanks and valve guides into alloy cylinder heads using Araldite 2 part glue following the instructions on the tubes to the letter not ever had a failure so far
You remove araldite by warming it up! It attacks aluminium and makes a professional repair difficult.
 
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